ARTIST GIVES VINTAGE PLAYBOY COVERS NEW SPARKLE

Available to buy at Castle Fine Art’s five London galleries – based at South Molton Street, Canary Wharf, The Royal Exchange, Covent Garden and St. Christopher’s Place – from Friday 15th January 2016, the new collection features six cover images dating from 1967-1982 which Claridge handpicked after being granted rare access to the Playboy archives.

 

Claridge, who was signed by Birmingham based art publishers Washington Green Fine Art in 2005 – joining its diverse portfolio of innovative contemporary artists – said:

“Playboy, to me, represents so many firsts… It’s progressive, revolutionary…I cannot emphasise enough the reach and scope of Playboy’s influence.

 Andy Warhol is the primary influence in my career; he famously created a Playboy cover cementing the relationship between Playboy and Pop Art, and paving the way for artists like me. I am so proud that my diamond dust collection is to be part of Playboy’s lineage in 20th century culture.”

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Souzou: Outsider Art From Japan

Souzu: Outsider Art From Japan

28 March – 30 June

Wellcome Collection – London

A new challenge for art curators and spectators:  the spring Wellcome Collection exhibition shows art works from people with disabilities. A unique collection created by 46 Japanese artists living in social welfare facilities.

Souzu is a Japanese word which means creation and imagination at the same time. Both meanings allude to a ‘force’  by which new ideas are born and take shape in the world

The exhibition brings together different art works such as drawings, ceramics and textiles to demonstrate that disability could be a huge incentive  for creativity.The aim is to explore the process of making through different six sections which are: Language, Making, Representation, Relationships, Culture, Possibilities. 

The Language section explores the artists’ ability to convey their thoughts and feelings by visual art, as verbal and written communication is challenging or impossible for them. Works range from Takanori Herai’s diary with black and white hieroglyphics to Toshiko Yamanishi’s multi coloured love letters for his mother, in which she expresses her love with bright polychromes.

Making part of the exhibition is characterized by massive use of unconventional materials. From Komei Bekki ceramic art works to the army of little soldiers created by Shota Katsube and styled out of the twist-ties used to fasten food.

The subjects in Representation section are taken from artists’ daily life. M. K. drawings on cardboards are irreverent mockeries of advertising billboards with, for example, naked models while Satoshi Nishikawa creates huge fruits aggregating small ceramic rabbits.

Relationships is the section dedicated to the people loved by the artists. Here the spectator can admire Sakiko Kono’s cotton dolls, representing staff and friends who have been kind to her in the residential facility and Masao Obata’s red drawings on cardboard, representing beautiful and naked women.

In Culture  artists take inspiration for pop culture. In fact in this section bright movies’ posters and paper cartoon figurines are displayed. Ryosuke Otsuji ceramic Okinawan Lions are appreciable because in popular Japanese culture they are thought to ward off  bad spirits.

Last part of the exhibition is dedicated to Possibilities area, a place in which the visitor will find Norimitsu Kokubo’s fictional cityscapes, Shingo Ikeda’s calculation of his journeys on Tokyo subway and Shinichi Sawada’s ceramic sea-monsters and mythical demons.

In the last room of the exhibition several screens in which the spectator can admire brief interviews with some of the artists of the exhibition.

Don’t miss the chance to explore different abilities and endless resources of these unconventional artists.

Take a glance at the video to see most relevant art works displayed…

(Images courtesy of Wellcome Collection Press Office).
 

Who’s Who: Interview with Graffiti Artist Hunto

Hunto is an Italian Graffiti Artist based in London. Born in 1982 in Brindisi, South of Italy, he loves depicting wonderful images of love, sex and twisted bodies, which have significant cubist echoes. His works are in different cities such as Milan, Rome, London and Berlin. He describes artistic creation as a kind of spontaneous ‘urge’ he possesses since he was a child.

Enjoy the Photogallery with his main works and a Brief Interview whit him!

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Let’s jump back to your childhood. How did your passion for art begin?

It was born with me.

Your works have strong cubist inspiration and your works are echoes of great artists such as Picasso and Braque. Why this stylistic choice?

It’s not a proper choice. That ‘s what I do, this is HUNTO. I do not know why. Certainly Picasso was one of the first books I flipped through the pages during my childhood. This artist has always fascinated me a lot.

Many of your works represent scenes of eros between men and women (sketches such as ‘Adam and Eve’, ‘Flirting’ or ‘Before having sex’). Why did you choose this topic?

It’s not a proper choice. When I paint I can hardly think about a specific topic, it just come out, it’s all very spontaneous and I enjoy it at the same time. Love, sex and family are my most frequent topics, but not always there is a message behind my works.

Do you have a muse in particular?

I think I unintentionally create my own muse in my paintings…

How do you usually choose the location for your pieces?

 You do not always have choices, but when it is an ‘illegal’ work it is more a ‘choice’.

What city do you think is the most suitable for street artists?

I do not think there is a city particularly suitable for street art … and it depends on what you mean by “street art”. I have so many great artists that I admire in the international scene … but they are always linked to my past and they are pioneers of my hometown (Brindisi).

In 2008 you have also painted at the Roman prison of Rebibbia…

For up to now one of the most interesting experiences I have ever had. Perhaps it was one of the few times that I was pushed by a strong ‘inspiration’. And certainly Rebibbia prison is a place where people would never expect to see “street art” works.

 What would you recommend to a young artist who wants to begin an artistic career?

 Well, I guess I’m not in a position to give advices because I consider myself a young artist. I do not know what to say …Surely ‘dreaming’ helps a lot.

Giuliana Patrone

Photo-Gallery: Cyrus Noname’s art works

I have just received an email from a young artist who lives in London. His name is Cyrus Noname and he comes from Hong Kong.

For Cyrus Art is a powerful device to express strong feelings. As he states:

The creative process is a spontaneous capture of feelings; it is a voyage into the darkness of humanity. With a bright palette, the artist creates labyrinths of distorted lines, in a provocative portrayal of the world’s absurdity. Having lured the viewers through an unsettling shade of grey, the visuals confound with their colorful splendor. ‘

He would like to share with ArtBabel followers his works, enjoy the photo gallery !

For more information visit the Hong Kong artist websitehttp://www.cyrusnoname.com

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Street Artist Pez Urban Glimpse

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The second Urban Glimpse of the month was captured by Tom at the Red Gallery (Shoreditch).

This colourful graffiti was painted by  Spanish artist El Pez, renowned for his smiles!

Born in Barcelona, he started painting in 1999 and now his works are displayed throughout the world, in cities such as New York, L.A. Tokyo, London, Miami, Paris, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Oslo and Bogota.

Let’s smile with him, 🙂 

Dorothy Iannone: Innocent and Aware

Licentious and Junoesque women example of the bold expressiveness of the American artist

Camden Arts Centre

8 March – 5 May

http://www.camdenartscentre.org/whats-on/view/exh-26#12

What is the role of Art? And how is Creativity  linked to Love? These are the main questions of Dorothy Iannone: Innocent and Aware. The art exhibition dedicated to the painter, currently at the London Camden Arts Centre, brings together main works between the 1970s and 1980s, including her last designs in which she stressed her attention on Tibetan Buddhist and its vision of life and ecstasy.

In the first room of the building a retrospective on Iannone’s favourite films called Movie people is displayed. The Berlin-based artist painted wooden supports in which she combines colourful and psychedelic images of famous characters of movies like Morocco, Nabokov masterpiece’s Lolita movie interpretation, Brokeback Mountain, Les Amants, Piano, Pandora, with epigrams in which she explains the plot to the art visitor, with an undeniable retro- vintage touch.

Brokeback Mountain, 2010 from the series movie people

Dorothy Iannone’s Brokeback Mountain, 2010. Photograph: Courtesy Air de Paris

At the back of the room several wooden human shaped figures are displayed: they are famous characters and the visitor could easily recognize, for example, famous British moviemaker Charlie Chaplin, President Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline, and British King Henry The 8th.

Going ahead in the exhibition, the spectator can understand in depth the world of Dorothy Iannone, populated by feminine figures. Plump Women seem like ‘enchanted’ by a promiscuous and lascivious atmosphere. They are portrayed twisted to men with blue and golden backgrounds, which remind the medieval mosaic technique.

For Iannone sexuality is joy and freedom, and along with art, the best device to overcome ‘mortality’. Art and passion are pure energy, an endless flux of vitality and attempt to overcome the transience of existence. Varied and multi cultural the inspirations for her works: from the Hindi world  to the byzantine mosaics, Iannone’s colourful vision of life is contagious and eager and involves the spectator into an unusual journey into the deepness of the complexity of love, sex and relationships.

Her style is flamboyant and eccentric: she loves mixing together funny epigrams with beautiful  women, contorted with their partners. Her works are a unique combination of text and decoration, which is an ode to free eroticism and libertinage. The artist vision of life is clearly displayed by her works: hippie dippy style and colourful eroticism scenes show her willingness to stress the pivotal role of the women in the history of the world. Subversive and odd, she reverses all the stereotypes of men and women roles, celebrating in many of her works the joy of her sexual and love relationship with the painter and poet Dieter Roth, met in 1967 in Reykjavik.

In works such as Love the stranger and Let the light from my lighthouse shine on you painting techniques and use of golden remind us Klimt artworks and Austrian artist’s obsession with strength and potentiality of eroticism. Iannone’s bodies are twisted together and bring us back to Indi Kama Sutra images and Naïve echoes.

Dorothy-Iannone

Dorothy Iannone, ‘Let The Light From My Lighthouse Shine on You’, 1981

Dorothy-Iannone 2

 Dorothy Iannone, Love the Stranger, 1981. Courtesy of the artist and Air de Paris, Paris

The next great moment in history is ours is a critique towards Western society and also an attempt to unchain all the prejudices linked to free eroticism and raise women’s awareness. It is a joyful manifesto dedicated to women’s complexity and power,  addressed to renowned women in the field of art and culture such as Charlotte Bronte, Emily Dickinson, Virginia Woolf, Isadora Duncan and Edith Piaf.

The Next Great Moment In History Is Ours, 1970

The Next Great Moment in History Is Ours, 1970 Photograph: courtesy Air de Paris, Paris

The exhibition closes with a huge sheet in which Iannone painted her entire life, once again combining funny and explicit erotic images with brief tales and private anecdotes. Regardless conventions and common censorship, her art is pure and free expression of ecstatic and original creativity, released from prejudices.

Despite the massive concentration on eroticism and sex scenes, which helped her to gain the nickname of ‘Bad Girl’, it is clear the importance of art as a powerful device of consolation. ‘Painting’ is a kind of ‘rescue’ for Iannone. As the artist states the creativity helps her to overcome sadness, ‘Art is the world I have created which never lets me down, a world which I can return again and again and smile, and be immortal’.

The first Urban Glimpse of April: Lovers Angels

Hi Street Art Lovers!

This morning I found an email from Lisa, who sent us a Londoner Urban Glimpse. This is the first one of April and represent a funny couple of angels

She found this wonderful graffiti on a building in Shoreditch, East London

Hope you like it. 

 

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