Chasing Ghosts – A Polaroid Exhibition

Curious Duke Gallery in East London is showing the first UK solo show of Polaroid artist Andrew Millar.

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7th– 30th April 2016

173 Whitecross Street, London EC1Y 8JT

Open Monday-Friday 11:30-6:30, Saturday 12-4

Nearest stations: Old Street (exit 6) and Barbican

Free

 

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Photogallery: Goya: The Witches and Old Women

Goya: The Witches and Old Women

26 February – 25 May 2015

The Courtauld Gallery, Somerset House, Strand, London, WC2R 0RN

To get more information: 

http://www.affaritaliani.it/culturaspettacoli/goya-quadri-mostra-londra.html




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The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier – From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk

The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier

From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk

 

When: 9 April 2014 – 25 August 2014

Where: Art Gallery – Barbican London

Who’s behind: the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts in collaboration with Maison Jean-Paul Gaultier

 Into the mind and creativity of one of the most remarkable fashion designers of the 20th century

This new exhibition at the Barbican brings together more than 140 design items created by the French genius in more than a decade of artistic inspiration. In fact Jean-Paul Gaultier is probably one of the most eclectic and iconic fashion designers over the last three decades.

The leitmotiv of the exhibition is the childish and always impressed creative twists of the French designer. The exhibitions includes quirky dresses and outfits taken from the world of pop music, including the famous iconic bra and corsets worn by American Pop Star Madonna during her flamboyant 1990 Blonde Ambition World Tour .

There is plenty of British and London 70’s inspiration in Gaultier’s design garments. Inspired by 70’s vintage street style, Gaultier has recently declared his never-ending  love for British lifestyle. For this reason a section of the exhibition is dedicated to the world of Brit Punk. The room called Punky Cancan is entirely dedicated to the cheerful and prolific meeting between punkish British style garments with the French and posh haute couture. Ripped checked kilts and tartan shirts are gently and cleverly mixed up with French-inspired ball gowns and elegant suits. Combining the love for the couture with the British lifestyle is peculiar for him.

Plenty of raw talent, the France born designer never attended a fashion school. He was only 17 when he started sending his drawings to famous haute couture stylist. In 1970 Pierre Cardin hired him as an assistant and this event marked the beginning of a prolific journey for the enfant terrible of the fashion. 

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(Images courtesy of Barbican Press Office –  © Matthew Lloyd / Getty images).

Giuliana Patrone

Stereoscopic Photographs of Pablo Picasso

22 February – 1 June 2014

The Holburne Museum – Bath

Free Admission

For the first time anywhere The Holburne Museum will host a remarkable collection of photographs of Pablo Picasso, taken in 3D. Pics were taken in 1957 by his friend Robert Mouzillat, at La Californie, Picasso’s villa near Cannes.

The spectator of this outstanding exhibition will wear 3D glasses in order to enjoy pictures of the Spanish painter in his art studio, surrounded by his paintings and sculptures or spending spare time with famous friends such as French writer Jean Cocteau and Spanish surrealist Jaime Sabartés.

Until the 1st ofJune.

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Souzou: Outsider Art From Japan

Souzu: Outsider Art From Japan

28 March – 30 June

Wellcome Collection – London

A new challenge for art curators and spectators:  the spring Wellcome Collection exhibition shows art works from people with disabilities. A unique collection created by 46 Japanese artists living in social welfare facilities.

Souzu is a Japanese word which means creation and imagination at the same time. Both meanings allude to a ‘force’  by which new ideas are born and take shape in the world

The exhibition brings together different art works such as drawings, ceramics and textiles to demonstrate that disability could be a huge incentive  for creativity.The aim is to explore the process of making through different six sections which are: Language, Making, Representation, Relationships, Culture, Possibilities. 

The Language section explores the artists’ ability to convey their thoughts and feelings by visual art, as verbal and written communication is challenging or impossible for them. Works range from Takanori Herai’s diary with black and white hieroglyphics to Toshiko Yamanishi’s multi coloured love letters for his mother, in which she expresses her love with bright polychromes.

Making part of the exhibition is characterized by massive use of unconventional materials. From Komei Bekki ceramic art works to the army of little soldiers created by Shota Katsube and styled out of the twist-ties used to fasten food.

The subjects in Representation section are taken from artists’ daily life. M. K. drawings on cardboards are irreverent mockeries of advertising billboards with, for example, naked models while Satoshi Nishikawa creates huge fruits aggregating small ceramic rabbits.

Relationships is the section dedicated to the people loved by the artists. Here the spectator can admire Sakiko Kono’s cotton dolls, representing staff and friends who have been kind to her in the residential facility and Masao Obata’s red drawings on cardboard, representing beautiful and naked women.

In Culture  artists take inspiration for pop culture. In fact in this section bright movies’ posters and paper cartoon figurines are displayed. Ryosuke Otsuji ceramic Okinawan Lions are appreciable because in popular Japanese culture they are thought to ward off  bad spirits.

Last part of the exhibition is dedicated to Possibilities area, a place in which the visitor will find Norimitsu Kokubo’s fictional cityscapes, Shingo Ikeda’s calculation of his journeys on Tokyo subway and Shinichi Sawada’s ceramic sea-monsters and mythical demons.

In the last room of the exhibition several screens in which the spectator can admire brief interviews with some of the artists of the exhibition.

Don’t miss the chance to explore different abilities and endless resources of these unconventional artists.

Take a glance at the video to see most relevant art works displayed…

(Images courtesy of Wellcome Collection Press Office).
 

Who’s Who: Interview with Graffiti Artist Hunto

Hunto is an Italian Graffiti Artist based in London. Born in 1982 in Brindisi, South of Italy, he loves depicting wonderful images of love, sex and twisted bodies, which have significant cubist echoes. His works are in different cities such as Milan, Rome, London and Berlin. He describes artistic creation as a kind of spontaneous ‘urge’ he possesses since he was a child.

Enjoy the Photogallery with his main works and a Brief Interview whit him!

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Let’s jump back to your childhood. How did your passion for art begin?

It was born with me.

Your works have strong cubist inspiration and your works are echoes of great artists such as Picasso and Braque. Why this stylistic choice?

It’s not a proper choice. That ‘s what I do, this is HUNTO. I do not know why. Certainly Picasso was one of the first books I flipped through the pages during my childhood. This artist has always fascinated me a lot.

Many of your works represent scenes of eros between men and women (sketches such as ‘Adam and Eve’, ‘Flirting’ or ‘Before having sex’). Why did you choose this topic?

It’s not a proper choice. When I paint I can hardly think about a specific topic, it just come out, it’s all very spontaneous and I enjoy it at the same time. Love, sex and family are my most frequent topics, but not always there is a message behind my works.

Do you have a muse in particular?

I think I unintentionally create my own muse in my paintings…

How do you usually choose the location for your pieces?

 You do not always have choices, but when it is an ‘illegal’ work it is more a ‘choice’.

What city do you think is the most suitable for street artists?

I do not think there is a city particularly suitable for street art … and it depends on what you mean by “street art”. I have so many great artists that I admire in the international scene … but they are always linked to my past and they are pioneers of my hometown (Brindisi).

In 2008 you have also painted at the Roman prison of Rebibbia…

For up to now one of the most interesting experiences I have ever had. Perhaps it was one of the few times that I was pushed by a strong ‘inspiration’. And certainly Rebibbia prison is a place where people would never expect to see “street art” works.

 What would you recommend to a young artist who wants to begin an artistic career?

 Well, I guess I’m not in a position to give advices because I consider myself a young artist. I do not know what to say …Surely ‘dreaming’ helps a lot.

Giuliana Patrone