Damien Hirst – Oslo 16-09-2015 -15-11-2015

Take a look at Damien Hirst exhibition currently displayed at Astrup Fearnley Museum in Oslo, Norway. In a spectacular glass and wood building designed by Italian architect Renzo Piani by Oslo port, you will find main outstanding artworks from Bristol born artist Damien Hirst.

This exhibition definitely worth a visit and features the well renowned For The Love of God, a sparkling skull decorated with hundreds of precious diamonds.

Take a look at my review on Artslife.com:

http://www.artslife.com/2015/10/19/damien-hirst-in-mostra-a-oslo-una-retrospettiva-per-lex-enfant-prodige/

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Ways Of Looking – How To Experience Contemporary Art

A new book released by Laurence King Publishing. Ways Of Looking – How To Experience Contemporary Art by Ossian Ward offers a vademecum for those who are keen on art and those who are not trained in art history.

Do you have issues in tackling the jungle of the often quirky and provocative contemporary art?  The former Art Review and Time out Editor has got a six step programme for understanding based on the tabula rasa – a clean slate and a fresh mind. Employing the Tabula Rasa methodology means clean up your mind form previous experiences and approaching beauty (a painting, a sculpture or whatever multimedia installation) with baby’s eyes.

Ossian Ward is Head of Content at the Lisson Gallery and a writer on contemporary art. He was previously chief art critic and visual arts editor at Time Out London and before that served as editor at Art Review.

Ways of Looking: How to Experience Contemporary Art by Ossian Ward (Laurence King, £9.95). 

This is Series – New in – Bacon and Gauguin

This is… series. New In: This is Bacon and This is Gauguin

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New Art Books from This is… series, by Laurence King Publishing Company

1. This is Gauguin, written by George Roddam and illustrated by Slawa Harasymowicz, is a new instalment in a major new art series that rethinks art history in a more engaging and stimulating way. Paul Gauguin was a member of a generation of artists who struggled against the stifling conformity of the late 19th century’s artistic mainstream.

Naive and rustic culture is an endless source of inspiration for his colourful and primitive canvas.

From his childhood in Peru to his experiences in Tahiti, Gauguin’s art is mainly presented by his most relevant and well renowned works such as Sleeping Child (1884), Van Gogh Painting Sunflowers (1888), Christ in the Garden of Olives (1889), Manao tupapau (The Spirit of the Dead Watching) (1892) and Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? (1897-98).

His choice to escape European civilization and “everything that is artificial and conventional” inevitably marked the life and the whole career of the French Parisian painter.

2. This is Bacon, by Kitty Hauser with illustrations by Christina Christoforou, is based on one of the giants dominating the artistic landscape of the mid-twentieth century. Source of inspiration for abstract art that came after him, the Irish artist is depicted through vivid and stunning illustrations.

The major periods of Bacon’s life on the edge, such as his time spent in Berlin, Paris and the seedy milieu of post-war London, are portrayed, along with the influential figures, such as Peter Lacey and George Dyer, who shaped both his personal life and his art.

Francis Bacon’s works featured in the book include: Three Studies for a Crucifixion (1962), Portrait of Isabel Rawsthorne (1966), Lying Figure (1969), Triptych, May-June (1973) and Sand Dune (1983).

Giuliana Patrone

Veuve Clicquot launches ‘Re-Creation Awards’ Design Competition

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On October 1st, Veuve Clicquot launched The Re‐Creation Awards, a new competition with an international judging panel including renowned designer Tom Dixon OBE.

Hosted in ten countries, the contest invites young designers and members of the public to create a limited edition of the Veuve Clicquot Mailbox. The gift box styled like a vintage American mailbox is inspired by Madame Clicquot’s archive letters to her clients, agents and suppliers.

The international winner will see their Mailbox design become the next limited edition for 2015, distributed worldwide, and revealed at Milan Design Week. The designer will also be featured in Wallpaper* Magazine and win 10,000€.

The competition will be judged in each country by the public and a jury of industry leaders, with the UK panel including internationally renowned designer Tom Dixon and Central St Martins Professor Nicholas Rhodes. Two finalists from each country will then be flown to the Hôtel du Marc, Veuve Clicquot’s hotel in Reims, France, for the International Final, judged by an influential judging panel including designers Pablo Reinoso and Ferrucio Laviani.

The competition opens on October 1st and all entries should be made before the deadline of November 15th. Submissions are to be made @ http://www.awards.veuve‐clicquot.com.

Check It Out @ Veuve Clicquot “Re-Creation Awards”!!!

More information can be found at the Veuve Clicquot Facebook page http://www.Facebook.com/veuveclicquotinternational

Souzou: Outsider Art From Japan

Souzu: Outsider Art From Japan

28 March – 30 June

Wellcome Collection – London

A new challenge for art curators and spectators:  the spring Wellcome Collection exhibition shows art works from people with disabilities. A unique collection created by 46 Japanese artists living in social welfare facilities.

Souzu is a Japanese word which means creation and imagination at the same time. Both meanings allude to a ‘force’  by which new ideas are born and take shape in the world

The exhibition brings together different art works such as drawings, ceramics and textiles to demonstrate that disability could be a huge incentive  for creativity.The aim is to explore the process of making through different six sections which are: Language, Making, Representation, Relationships, Culture, Possibilities. 

The Language section explores the artists’ ability to convey their thoughts and feelings by visual art, as verbal and written communication is challenging or impossible for them. Works range from Takanori Herai’s diary with black and white hieroglyphics to Toshiko Yamanishi’s multi coloured love letters for his mother, in which she expresses her love with bright polychromes.

Making part of the exhibition is characterized by massive use of unconventional materials. From Komei Bekki ceramic art works to the army of little soldiers created by Shota Katsube and styled out of the twist-ties used to fasten food.

The subjects in Representation section are taken from artists’ daily life. M. K. drawings on cardboards are irreverent mockeries of advertising billboards with, for example, naked models while Satoshi Nishikawa creates huge fruits aggregating small ceramic rabbits.

Relationships is the section dedicated to the people loved by the artists. Here the spectator can admire Sakiko Kono’s cotton dolls, representing staff and friends who have been kind to her in the residential facility and Masao Obata’s red drawings on cardboard, representing beautiful and naked women.

In Culture  artists take inspiration for pop culture. In fact in this section bright movies’ posters and paper cartoon figurines are displayed. Ryosuke Otsuji ceramic Okinawan Lions are appreciable because in popular Japanese culture they are thought to ward off  bad spirits.

Last part of the exhibition is dedicated to Possibilities area, a place in which the visitor will find Norimitsu Kokubo’s fictional cityscapes, Shingo Ikeda’s calculation of his journeys on Tokyo subway and Shinichi Sawada’s ceramic sea-monsters and mythical demons.

In the last room of the exhibition several screens in which the spectator can admire brief interviews with some of the artists of the exhibition.

Don’t miss the chance to explore different abilities and endless resources of these unconventional artists.

Take a glance at the video to see most relevant art works displayed…

(Images courtesy of Wellcome Collection Press Office).
 

Who’s Who: Interview with Graffiti Artist Hunto

Hunto is an Italian Graffiti Artist based in London. Born in 1982 in Brindisi, South of Italy, he loves depicting wonderful images of love, sex and twisted bodies, which have significant cubist echoes. His works are in different cities such as Milan, Rome, London and Berlin. He describes artistic creation as a kind of spontaneous ‘urge’ he possesses since he was a child.

Enjoy the Photogallery with his main works and a Brief Interview whit him!

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Let’s jump back to your childhood. How did your passion for art begin?

It was born with me.

Your works have strong cubist inspiration and your works are echoes of great artists such as Picasso and Braque. Why this stylistic choice?

It’s not a proper choice. That ‘s what I do, this is HUNTO. I do not know why. Certainly Picasso was one of the first books I flipped through the pages during my childhood. This artist has always fascinated me a lot.

Many of your works represent scenes of eros between men and women (sketches such as ‘Adam and Eve’, ‘Flirting’ or ‘Before having sex’). Why did you choose this topic?

It’s not a proper choice. When I paint I can hardly think about a specific topic, it just come out, it’s all very spontaneous and I enjoy it at the same time. Love, sex and family are my most frequent topics, but not always there is a message behind my works.

Do you have a muse in particular?

I think I unintentionally create my own muse in my paintings…

How do you usually choose the location for your pieces?

 You do not always have choices, but when it is an ‘illegal’ work it is more a ‘choice’.

What city do you think is the most suitable for street artists?

I do not think there is a city particularly suitable for street art … and it depends on what you mean by “street art”. I have so many great artists that I admire in the international scene … but they are always linked to my past and they are pioneers of my hometown (Brindisi).

In 2008 you have also painted at the Roman prison of Rebibbia…

For up to now one of the most interesting experiences I have ever had. Perhaps it was one of the few times that I was pushed by a strong ‘inspiration’. And certainly Rebibbia prison is a place where people would never expect to see “street art” works.

 What would you recommend to a young artist who wants to begin an artistic career?

 Well, I guess I’m not in a position to give advices because I consider myself a young artist. I do not know what to say …Surely ‘dreaming’ helps a lot.

Giuliana Patrone

Quiz Nouvelle Vague Icons: Brigitte Bardot

le-mepris

 

Brigitte Bardot is probably the most beautiful Diva from the Nouvelle Vague Cinema Movement. This is a stunning pic in which she is represented naked on a white fluffy carpet. She is gorgeous, isn’t she?

This quiz is addressed to all her fans. Do you remember what movie is it? Try to guess and have fun !